Journal Prompt #7

What’s on your bookshelf and why is it there?
First let me begin by stating that in my home, there are many bookshelves. If I had a library room I would be extremely happy. (Flashback: I did once rent a house that was owned by the Anglican Church and used to be the rectory. There was a room built into the closed in verandah that had been turned into an office/study that had one whole wall of bookcases. I loved that room! Even now when I think of it, it brings a smile to my face and memories of warm, sunny days with a cool breeze blowing through whilst I studied at my desk in the room. *sigh*).
Okay, where was I?
That’s right – bookshelves and books!
I have many book shelves in my home. Most are in my computer/craft room with others in the back room. I confess that I have two cupboards filled with books. Here are just a couple of photos to show you what I mean.

ImageImageImageAs you can see, I have an eclectic taste in reading material with many craft books interspersed with those on Australian history, gardening, management and people skills and personal development.
And then there is my fiction cupboard.
001-copyThis cupboard holds books that are both fiction, biographical and autobiographical.
It is filled with my favourite authors including Kathy Reichs, Isobelle Carmody, Stephen Donaldson, Dan Brown, Fiona McIntosh, Jean M. Auel, Tolkein and C.S. Lewis.
They sit alongside books about celebrities, self-help and personal development books and more books about Australian history.
But here are the books that come with me wherever I move to and ones that are never loaned or given away. Each of these books has touched me in some way.

004-copy 009-copyOkay, the aromatherapy and the one on hugs sneaked into the photo πŸ˜‰
The top photo is of the Bible that I earned for learning scripture verses in Sunday School and was presented to me in 1976. I have other Bibles but this one will never be replaced.
Now let’s look at my others:
Room 105: this book (signed by the author) is a true story of a man’s journey in understanding why God took his wife and son from him
He Who Wept: a fictionalised account of Jeremiah a.k.a. The Weeping Prophet
Immanuel – Reflections on the life of Christ: filled with the lyrics of Michael Card’s music. This book (and his CDs) played an important role at a time in my life when I felt that faith was all that I had to cling to.
The Vinegar Boy: a fictionalised account of a young boy who was there at the crucifixion of Christ and offered him vinegar water to sip as he died
Watership Down: Yes, it is a book about rabbits however it contains so much more within it.
Toad of Toad Hall & Wind in the Willows: ‘Toad’ is the script for the production we did in primary school with Mr Noonan. I was 12 years old and I played ‘Mole’. Lots of fun memories there. And Wind in the Willows because that is where ‘Toad’ was taken from.
The Jungle Book: because Rudyard Kipling is a master storyteller.
The Horse Whisperer: because it is not often that contemporary fiction can make me cry but this one did. I defy anyone to read this without picturing Robert Redford as the leading man.
Jonathon Livingston Seagull: I grew up in the 70’s. This was required coming of age reading.
A Town Like Alice: This book inspired a mini-series here in Australia. Alice Springs is a beautiful place and this story by Neville Shute is awesome.
Memoirs of a Geisha: It’s not often a book draws me in from the first pages. This one did.
The Kite Runner: Putting a human face on world affairs causes you to look at them in different ways.
Shark Down Under: Walking home from school each day I would call into a local bookshop and dream. I put this book on lay-by and paid each week with my pocket money. It was the very first book I ever bought for myself. It details the history of shark attacks in Australia (up to the 70’s) and is now falling apart.
Gone with the Wind: Told you I had it on my bookshelf.
Against the Wind: A fictionalised story (based on fact) of convicts in the early days of Australia. This copy of the book has Jon English on the cover as he played the lead in the television mini-series
Dead Man Running: This one sneaked into the photo but in case you’re interested, it’s about a former bikie club member who turned and shared information with the police. It is a story about police ineptitude and criminal activity. (Laurie, you might like this one as it’s set in our area).

So that’s my bookshelf.
Now share the name of your favourite book/s and why they are you faves.

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29 thoughts on “Journal Prompt #7

  1. I always love posts about people’ book shelves. Thanks for sharing yours! I would have a hard time naming favorite authors as there are so many, but in non fiction, I would say Clarissa Pinkola EstΓ©s and Joseph Campbell. In fiction, I would include Timothy Zahn, Joan D. Vinge, Kevin J. Anderson. As for graphic novels, it would be Roger Leloup without hesitation. I feel like I should include a trillion more authors whose writing I love!

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  2. I really like your bookshelves Sue. In many years I used to call my books for my gold. I did also bring most of them, when I relocated to Spain.
    I sit in another room, than where my books are now. I don’t have space in my creative room. To my books: Personal Development, Spiritual Development, Creative books, Cooking books, Dictionaries in several language. I think, that I came around the most of them here. If you want to know more, just ask.
    Irene

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  3. That’s quite an impressive book stash. Other than self-help, photography how to’s, and craft books, I have to admit, my bookshelves are rather bare. It’s time to expand my horizons.

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  4. I had lots and lots of books and then we moved – to this very small house. I gave lots and lots away and now miss them very much. The one I most cherish and kept is Burheads Confessions by Guy Howard Hansen. my mother read this to us as children in the late 50’s while we traveled 1400 miles in a vehicle to live in Alaska. It isn’t a children’s book. I think she just read to keep her sanity and four children under 6 quiet! We loved it though and my brother surprised me with a copy a few years ago. It’s been out of print forever and he found one on the internet. I saw one on Amazon recently. Keep collecting. One day that library room will happen!

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    1. That is just an awesome memory to have.
      When my tv blew up when my oldest two were little, we spent our nights reading. I read the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe to them amongst others.

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  5. Thank you for sharing all your books! Or what we can see anyway. πŸ˜‰ I can no longer hold books in my hands so I’m one who is thankful for books online these days, but I will admit I used to love holding a book. I’ve read many of the same books you have, in fact! I love the smell of books. πŸ™‚ Ahhhh….nice memory!

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    1. How fantastic that you’ve read a lot of the same books. The world just keeps getting smaller doesn’t it?
      I have books on my iPad but I confess that I forget to read them most of the time.

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  6. Sue it is like taking a peek inside your soul your collection tells a lot about you. Im a book nut and have run out of wall space, so now I lend them out to others and we share and recycle. I remember reading Gone with the Wind when I was wee lass and I loved it and the movie oh dear showing my age now…….

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  7. Such a fun post! I keep joking that my son is going to be miserable when I’m gone because of the many bookshelves that will have to be dealt with! Oh my!
    So many books to list, so I’ll just offer two recent ones.
    My book group is currently reading The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh, and last month we read The House Girl by Tara Conklin.

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    1. They sound interesting.
      Funnily enough, I had two books (reading for my studies) delivered at work yesterday. My colleague said to me (The Garden Gnome) must love you very much – either that or he’s extremely tolerant. lol

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    1. That’s funny Susan. Yes, it was when I was in my 20’s that I read all of her books. I remember buying them at a bookstore in Brisbane. It was the changeover point between central station and the bus stop on my way to work. πŸ˜‰

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  8. A great collection of books there Sue.
    You have given me a few suggestions which I will pursue through our library here.
    I would be interested in your opinion on the great and late Australian author Bryce Courtney.
    I am sure you will enjoy his fictionalized storys on early Australia.
    Ian

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    1. I love Bryce Courtney books Ian although I confess that I haven’t read them all. Bryce was a powerful writer and he often wrote of human suffering and cruelty with raw honesty. I found those pages extremely difficult to read and therefore didn’t even read some of his books.
      I have read the Potato Factory set (I think there were three of them in there) and Four Fires. My favourite of his was a book called Jessica.
      I actually blogged about Bryce once. https://suzjones.wordpress.com/2013/12/28/listening-to-yourself/

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  9. well sis you know where you got your love of books from and i am proud you passed that to your children and Rach is passing that to her children

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